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Brachial Plexus Anatomy


Brachial Plexus Anatomy By Dr. Jim Greene

 

 

The brachial plexus can be described as a network of nerves that connect your spine to your arm. Basically there are five nerve roots that begin in the upper part of your spine and end in five main roots that control the movements and sensations of your arms.


 The brachial plexus can be described as a network of nerves that connect your spine to your arm. Basically there are five nerve roots that begin in the upper part of your spine and end in five main roots that control the movements and sensations of your arms. It is located right where the neck joins the shoulder. To be precise, it is between your spine and your upper arm or behind your clavicle.

It branches out into five sections namely roots, trunks, divisions, cords and nerves. The anterior branches join and form the upper, middle and lower trunks. Each of these trunks further divides into anterior and posterior divisions behind the clavicle. These then combine to form three cords which are the lateral, medial and posterior. These cords receive their names based on their position to that of the axillary artery.

The above mentioned cords divide and then again combine to form the major nerves of our arm. The posterior cord branches into the axillary and radial nerves. The medial cord branches out in to the ulnar nerve and a limb of the median nerve. The lateral cord too branches out into one limb of the median nerve and the musculocutaneous nerve.

Brachial Plexus is a complex system of nerves. These nerves are important for the movement of your arms. Though surgery is possible, due to the complexity of the nerves, surgery may not be able to restore the normal anatomy. It would be wise for you to be careful when it comes to your brachial plexus system.

By now you should realize that the Brachial Plexus plays an important role in the use of your arms. In order to take care of it, you need to stay clear of straining or tearing your nerves in that particular region. It doesn't always have to be serious or undergo surgery. Often you can injure it but not need surgery since it will heal on its own but if the pain persists, you are advised to visit the nearest doctor immediately.

Brachial Plexus injury is very common among sports players. They manage to strain or tare their nerves more than the others. It is always advised to be careful while playing any sport. Do not strain yourself. Remember that the stronger the injury, the more pain. If you injure it severely, you may lose the use of your arm. Be wise and take care!

 

Article Provided by 247Surgery

 

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