Cerebral Palsy News and Discussion Forum
 
           

cerebralpalsy

 

How to Select the Right Technology to Help Your Loved One


How to Select the Right Technology to Help Your Loved One By Tabitha Grace Smith

 

 

When people think about personal technology they might think iPods, HD TVs and computers, but these aren't the only technologies available today. There's a growing trend in making assistive technology to help those in long term care situations - and a lot of options to wade through for caregivers.


 When people think about personal technology they might think iPods, HD TVs and computers, but these aren't the only technologies available today. There's a growing trend in making assistive technology to help those in long term care situations - and a lot of options to wade through for caregivers.

Assistive technology can be particularly useful for caregivers who may need assistance in monitoring their care recipients - one example of assistive technology is telecare. Telecare uses electronic sensors connected to an alarm system to help caregivers manage risk and help vulnerable people stay independent at home longer. Alerts can be cus-tomized to the particular person's risks. When the alert is triggered, (such as the temperature of the home going below the safe zone or the loved one falling) a message is sent to a caregiver or contact center who can respond appropriately.

Other types of assistive technologies include hearing aids, products that assist with bathing and home life, and technologies that make it possible to view text larger on the computer.

Here are some basic tips to keep in mind when considering which assistive technology for your loved one:

1. Focus on actual needs. Make sure the items help your loved one perform actual tasks he or she wants to perform. It's easy to buy products that look good, but don't address your loved one's needs.

2. Go Simple. The more complex something is, the harder it can be to use. Keep life simple by choosing simple products. Usually simple items are less expensive and easier to repair and maintain.

3. Ask an expert. Ask your doctor, rehabilitation specialists or physical and occupational therapists about which type of technology might be best. These people often have seen and used the items in question and can give you helpful feedback.

4. Ask others. If you know of other people with disabilities and special needs, ask what products they have found to be helpful. Ask other caregivers too! Join a group such as AGIS' online forums. You can also check consumer ratings online.

5. Use or rent on a trial basis. Find out if you can use or rent the item in question before committing to buy it. Check local hospital supply or rental stores.

6. Remember your loved one. If your loved one isn't going to use the item in question, what's the point in buying it? Make sure to discuss it with them and make sure the device is comfortable, attractive, and simple to use.

 

Article Provided by AssistGuide Information Services

 

 RELATED NEWS

Quantcast